MACAULEY CULKIN HAS A PIZZA THEMED VELVET UNDERGROUND COVER BAND
The Home Alone star is all grown-up and in a band called The Pizza Underground. They cover Velvet Underground songs, but change the lyrics to make them more pizza-y. Sounds about right.
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The band recorded an EP at Macauley’s house back in November. You can check them out on Bandcamp and in the 15-minute video below.

Enjoy a sampling of random images from the official Pizza Underground Tumblr.




(via Rolling Stone)

MACAULEY CULKIN HAS A PIZZA THEMED VELVET UNDERGROUND COVER BAND

The Home Alone star is all grown-up and in a band called The Pizza Underground. They cover Velvet Underground songs, but change the lyrics to make them more pizza-y. Sounds about right.

Read More

Daily Graffiti: Foot Soldier Edition

FUN FACT: The Foot Clan from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics are a parody of The Hand, a similar ninjutsu crime group from the Daredevil comics.

Graffiti by the always awesome TWE Crew.

CHECK IT: More geeky Graffiti from Albotas
JOIN US: The Albotas Geek Graffiti Flickr group
Why ‘The Angry Beavers’ Was Cancelled
As a child watching this toon of two beavers that enjoyed yelling at each other, you kind of just watch cartoons fade away and become replaced with another generation of animation and newer shows. The Angry Beavers was canned in the early 2000’s. After 62 episodes being aired on Nick, it was done. But it never had its finale because it never aired on television. And as a child you might have not known that, or the reason why Nick wouldn’t allow it to air on television.
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Truth is, The Angry Beavers did have a series finale planned out. It was titled "Bye-Bye Beavers," and it involved the show’s two stars, Daggett and Norbert, breaking the fourth wall and directly mentioning that they were being cancelled. According to Micah Wright, a staffer at Angry Beavers, Nick didn’t like that very much.
Off his official website:

Norb has to break the horrible truth to Dag that they are only cartoons. Nickelodeon hated this episode because it actually told the kids the truth: that the show was ending!

There are rumors stating that Nick has a strict rule on cartoons breaking the fourth wall and telling kids that they are actually cartoons. I’m not sure how true this is, but I actually don’t ever recall a cartoon other than Ren & Stimpy (maybe?) pushing that boundary in any way. Plus, it’s one thing to tell Nick’s target demographic they’re not real. It’s another to tell kids they’re being cancelled. And it’s a whole different ballpark to literally make jabs at the network that’s presenting your cartoon.
And that’s exactly what "Bye-Bye Beavers," did — it jabbed at Nick at every which way possible. Norb and Dag are going off about being cartoons, their show getting cancelled, and Nick making so much money off of reruns without getting the show’s creators a dime. Thus, the episode never got a green-light to air, and the series was cancelled an episode short of being finished.
The audio of the script was released by Wright himself on his website. There’s also a YouTube link, for those who don’t want to download the .mp3 file. It’s a rough draft being read by voice actors Richard Steven Horvitz (Dag) and Nick Bakay (Norb), occasionally using improv between lines and calling themselves by their first names. The ending of the episode also had the two shouting “APRIL FOOLS!,” prompting people to begin rumors that this episode was meant to air as an April Fools episode, but was canned on the spot since Nick doesn’t like fourth wall jokes.
Seeing on how it never even got storyboarded in the first place, I doubt the episode will ever see the light of day. The rough audio working may have just been recorded for the Hell of it, or because they simply worked backwards on their show. Don’t know, but at least the audio has surfaced on the web somehow.

Why ‘The Angry Beavers’ Was Cancelled

As a child watching this toon of two beavers that enjoyed yelling at each other, you kind of just watch cartoons fade away and become replaced with another generation of animation and newer shows. The Angry Beavers was canned in the early 2000’s. After 62 episodes being aired on Nick, it was done. But it never had its finale because it never aired on television. And as a child you might have not known that, or the reason why Nick wouldn’t allow it to air on television.

Read More

90’s Cartoon Characters Go To NY Fashion Week

Bevis, Butthead, Sailor Moon, and other animated 90’s icons rock high end fashion in this tribute to New York Fashion Week by Michele Moricci. We’d love to see even more characters added to this. Just imagine the dudes from Hey, Arnold! rocking some dapper duds.

(Source: highsnobiety.com)

LEGO N64 Transformers

Baron von Brunk combined three 90’s childhood staples into a great set of toys that I wish would have existed when I was a kid. These were made for the Summer 2013 Toy Brick Contest. Check out the Instructables to see how they were made.

(Shoutout to McViper for the tip)

Child of the 90s by Column Five

Microsoft, the damage is done. I’m never coming back. Except for when I want to play some PC games. But I’ve got to admit, your marketing has been pretty great. From the bold colors and minimalist, angular design of the Windows Phone 8 Mobile (or whatever you’re calling it) print ads, to this awesome, Webby-nominated ad for Internet Explorer, you’re actually out-Appling Apple. That said, most people who use IE have fond memories of the 1960s, not the ’90s. It’s a great video nonetheless.

Check it: More awesome videos on Albotas
Buy: 11" MacBook Air
Forgotten Freshness: You Can’t Do That On Television
Man, how the times have changed. Back in the 80’s, it was totally okay to have children’s sketch comedy show where families were so poor that their children got repossessed, it was okay for middle-aged man dressed as a scuba diver to share a bathtub with an underage girl, and there was even a recurring sketch about children being sentenced to death by firing squad.
You Can’t Do That On Television: Poverty & Unemployment Pt.1

Originally a low budget children’s sketch comedy show in 1979 for local Ottowa, Canada station CJOH-TV, You Can’t Do That On Television was picked up by Nickelodeon in 1981. Each episode’s sketches always centered around a main theme and the show is most known for its “slime” gag where green slime fell from the sky onto the actors’ heads every time they said “I don’t know.” To this day, green slime is a staple of Nickelodeon’s brand identity. In addition to the slime if any of the actors said “water,” water would fall on them.
You Can’t Do That On Television: Poverty & Unemployment Pt. 2

YCDTOTV was definitely a pretty edgy show, even by today’s standards. Episode themes centered around things like poverty, fashion, and the future, but some episodes were banned. An episode about adoption was banned in the U.S. and Canada and an episode about divorce was banned in Canada.
Once Nickelodeon picked up the show and tried aiming it toward a younger demographic, it kind of started going downhill. While originally made for teens and pre-teens, episodes about things like sexual equality, peer pressure, and drugs were replaced by more kiddy-ish potty humor.
The show lasted until 1990 and reruns were aired until 1994. In 2004, there was a reunion special called Project 131 and you can watch the whole thing on YouTube.
You Can’t Do That On Television: Poverty & Unemployment Pt. 3 
Watching these old episodes, it’s definitely hard to imagine this sort of thing flying on TV today. As much as people complain that TV is too violent or oversexualized, I think they tend to forget how things used to be. Not saying anything was wrong with the good old days of children’s entertainment, though. If anything, this show deserves respect for not talking down to kids and talking about real issues.
And, come on, could you even imagine how if there was a children’s program where kids were being shot by a firing squad this day and age? Uptight parents would have a fit!
Maybe that’s the main divide between kids and grown-ups. Kids have the ability to see the humor in everything while grown-ups tend to take everything way too seriously.
Trivia:
Canadian singer Allanis Morrisette was on the show when she was just 5 years old in 1979 and was on again in 1986 for an episode about pop music. Dave Coulier was also working for Nickelodeon around this time on the show Out Of Control. Alanis Morisette’s song “You Oughta Know” is about Dave Coulier!!! Coincidence?
The show’s opening animation, The Children’s Television Sausage Factor was inspired by Terry Gilliam's “gilliamations.” That’s the same Terry Gilliam from Monty Python’s Flying Circus. He also directed some movies you’ve probably heard of like 12 Monkeys, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus.
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Forgotten Freshness: You Can’t Do That On Television

Man, how the times have changed. Back in the 80’s, it was totally okay to have children’s sketch comedy show where families were so poor that their children got repossessed, it was okay for middle-aged man dressed as a scuba diver to share a bathtub with an underage girl, and there was even a recurring sketch about children being sentenced to death by firing squad.

You Can’t Do That On Television: Poverty & Unemployment Pt.1

Originally a low budget children’s sketch comedy show in 1979 for local Ottowa, Canada station CJOH-TV, You Can’t Do That On Television was picked up by Nickelodeon in 1981. Each episode’s sketches always centered around a main theme and the show is most known for its “slime” gag where green slime fell from the sky onto the actors’ heads every time they said “I don’t know.” To this day, green slime is a staple of Nickelodeon’s brand identity. In addition to the slime if any of the actors said “water,” water would fall on them.

You Can’t Do That On Television: Poverty & Unemployment Pt. 2

YCDTOTV was definitely a pretty edgy show, even by today’s standards. Episode themes centered around things like poverty, fashion, and the future, but some episodes were banned. An episode about adoption was banned in the U.S. and Canada and an episode about divorce was banned in Canada.

Once Nickelodeon picked up the show and tried aiming it toward a younger demographic, it kind of started going downhill. While originally made for teens and pre-teens, episodes about things like sexual equality, peer pressure, and drugs were replaced by more kiddy-ish potty humor.

The show lasted until 1990 and reruns were aired until 1994. In 2004, there was a reunion special called Project 131 and you can watch the whole thing on YouTube.

You Can’t Do That On Television: Poverty & Unemployment Pt. 3 

Watching these old episodes, it’s definitely hard to imagine this sort of thing flying on TV today. As much as people complain that TV is too violent or oversexualized, I think they tend to forget how things used to be. Not saying anything was wrong with the good old days of children’s entertainment, though. If anything, this show deserves respect for not talking down to kids and talking about real issues.

And, come on, could you even imagine how if there was a children’s program where kids were being shot by a firing squad this day and age? Uptight parents would have a fit!

Maybe that’s the main divide between kids and grown-ups. Kids have the ability to see the humor in everything while grown-ups tend to take everything way too seriously.

Trivia:

  • Canadian singer Allanis Morrisette was on the show when she was just 5 years old in 1979 and was on again in 1986 for an episode about pop music. Dave Coulier was also working for Nickelodeon around this time on the show Out Of Control. Alanis Morisette’s song You Oughta Know is about Dave Coulier!!! Coincidence?
  • The show’s opening animation, The Children’s Television Sausage Factor was inspired by Terry Gilliam's “gilliamations.” That’s the same Terry Gilliam from Monty Python’s Flying Circus. He also directed some movies you’ve probably heard of like 12 Monkeys, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus.
Follow Albotas on Twitter | Like Albotas on Facebook
The Walking Dead Gets A 90’s Intro
Yesterday we posted a 90’s Breaking Bad intro, and now we have a VHS-tastic nostalgiafied Walking Dead throwback complete with fuzzy VCR effects and cheesy mood music.

Thanks to Chad for sending this in!

The Walking Dead Gets A 90’s Intro

Yesterday we posted a 90’s Breaking Bad intro, and now we have a VHS-tastic nostalgiafied Walking Dead throwback complete with fuzzy VCR effects and cheesy mood music.

Thanks to Chad for sending this in!

Breaking Bad As A 90’s Family Show
Breaking Bad gets a 1995 style intro that makes us want to watch old episodes of Home Improvement and Life Goes On.

Breaking Bad As A 90’s Family Show

Breaking Bad gets a 1995 style intro that makes us want to watch old episodes of Home Improvement and Life Goes On.

Daily Graffiti
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles graffiti spotted by eighty8five.0.
Check out our Daily Graffiti Archives for more geektastic street art!
Add your geeky graffiti pics to our Group Pool on Flickr!

Daily Graffiti: Ren & Stimpy Edition

Captain Höek and Cadet Stimpy in street art form from the episode “Space Madness” which always creeped me out as a kid. The whole thing about eating soap always made me queasy.

Entire “Space Madness” episode embedded below for great justice.

Check out our Daily Graffiti Archives for more geektastic street art!

Add your geeky graffiti pics to our Group Pool on Flickr!

90’s Nostalgia: The Tales from the Crypt Saturday Morning Game Show

So when I was five years old, Tales from the Crypt was a pretty fucking huge deal for HBO. My father always watched it and I was kind of always around to squeal or run away from his television set while it played, but the memories and nostalgia always lingered of the Crypt Keeper and his fucked up tales of horror. But something crossed my mind the other day and I don’t think many people remember this, but do you remember the Crypt Keeper’s gameshow?

I hardly do. With the help of Google/Wikipedia/YouTube, I’m watching it over and thinking: How in the fuck did this crazy ass Saturday morning children’s game show air, of all networks, on CBS? And how did it last for one year?

The show was called Secrets of the Crypt Keeper’s Haunted House, and it involved kids going through physical challenges, Legend of the Hidden Temple style. They had a section of the challenge titled “The Swamp From Hell and used a shit ton of bad CGI to animate it.

Thanks to a user on YouTube, an episode is on the Internet to peep in three different parts. I guess the uploader, bojibbles, was a contestent on the show. Enjoy this hidden gem with me, because my brain doesn’t want to shit bricks alone at remembering this show at random.

Daily Graffiti: Go-Go Gadget Graffiti!
Once upon a time Inspector Gadget was my favorite cartoon as a kid.
(Via The World’s Best Ever, Ekosystem)
Check out the DAILY GRAFFITI ARCHIVES for more geektastic street art!
Add your geeky graffiti pics to our Group Pool on Flickr!

Daily Graffiti: Go-Go Gadget Graffiti!

Once upon a time Inspector Gadget was my favorite cartoon as a kid.

(Via The World’s Best Ever, Ekosystem)

Check out the DAILY GRAFFITI ARCHIVES for more geektastic street art!

Add your geeky graffiti pics to our Group Pool on Flickr!

Johnny Cupcakes X Nickelodeon
Johnny Cupcakes was actually a huge driving inspiration behind the initial concept of Albotas back in the day, so we’re more than stoked to learn about is new project involving some of the the most generation-defining cartoons of all time.

Johnny Cupcakes X Nickelodeon

Johnny Cupcakes was actually a huge driving inspiration behind the initial concept of Albotas back in the day, so we’re more than stoked to learn about is new project involving some of the the most generation-defining cartoons of all time.

Gentlemen, Set Your DVRs
If you read Albotas, you’re probably in your 20s, so this is for you. Entertainment Weekly reports that Nickelodeon will be adding a two hour time slot for re-airing some of its shows from the ’90s. The shows will be on a channel called TeenNick, and go from midnight to 2AM. The initial line-up consists of Keenan & Kel, Rugrats, and Clarissa Explains It All, among others. Nick says they will add more shows eventually. Rocko’s Modern Life, please!

Gentlemen, Set Your DVRs

If you read Albotas, you’re probably in your 20s, so this is for you. Entertainment Weekly reports that Nickelodeon will be adding a two hour time slot for re-airing some of its shows from the ’90s. The shows will be on a channel called TeenNick, and go from midnight to 2AM. The initial line-up consists of Keenan & Kel, Rugrats, and Clarissa Explains It All, among others. Nick says they will add more shows eventually. Rocko’s Modern Life, please!

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