DAILY GRAFFITI: THAT ONE TIME THANOS AND CARNAGE HUNG OUT EDITION
Here’s a ginormous street art mural of Thanos and Carnage wearing what looks like the robe Rocky wore to the ring. The full piece features the handywork of Merlyn, Kooltaste, Hose, Stom500, Uncle Ho, DarkElixir, Jack El Diablo, and Wise.
Check out a snazzily edited video of the creation of the piece below.

(via Startape)
CHECK IT: More geeky Graffiti on AlbotasSUBMIT: The Albotas Geek Graffiti Flickr group

DAILY GRAFFITI: THAT ONE TIME THANOS AND CARNAGE HUNG OUT EDITION

Here’s a ginormous street art mural of Thanos and Carnage wearing what looks like the robe Rocky wore to the ring. The full piece features the handywork of Merlyn, Kooltaste, Hose, Stom500, Uncle Ho, DarkElixir, Jack El Diablo, and Wise.

Check out a snazzily edited video of the creation of the piece below.

(via Startape)

CHECK IT: More geeky Graffiti on Albotas
SUBMIT: The Albotas Geek Graffiti Flickr group
PRE-ORDER THE SAGA, VOL. 3 PAPERBACK FOR LESS THAN THE DIGITAL VERSION
If you read comics and haven’t picked up Saga yet, you’re being a complete jerk to yourself. (We hyped it up here way back when.) Go get Vol. 1 (down to $5.64 from $9.99) and Vol. 2 ($11.57 from $14.99), and while you’re at it, just go ahead and pre-order the third volume which drops on March 25. It’s only $12.33 for a paperback versus $14.99 for the Kindle edition. Oh yeah, and it’s one of the most character rich, well-paced, and highly imaginative comics to come out in recent memory.

PRE-ORDER THE SAGA, VOL. 3 PAPERBACK FOR LESS THAN THE DIGITAL VERSION

If you read comics and haven’t picked up Saga yet, you’re being a complete jerk to yourself. (We hyped it up here way back when.) Go get Vol. 1 (down to $5.64 from $9.99) and Vol. 2 ($11.57 from $14.99), and while you’re at it, just go ahead and pre-order the third volume which drops on March 25. It’s only $12.33 for a paperback versus $14.99 for the Kindle edition. Oh yeah, and it’s one of the most character rich, well-paced, and highly imaginative comics to come out in recent memory.

Hero-Glyphics

Here’s a line of hieroglyphics created by Josh Lane, celebrating the heroes of our time. They’re on sale right over here if you want a print. Loving the Hobgoblin and Spider-Man one.

Indie Comic Roundup
It’s time for my weekly link dump of all things comics-related on the lesser known and not Marvel/DC side of things. Today’s got links featuring Drawn & Quarterly, a sweet Mondo print by Paolo Rivera, Sean Phillips and Ed Brubaker, some links to charities and donation sites due to this week’s holiday season and recent troublesome events, reviews by yours truly, some lists to top off 2013 in comics, and a whole lot of other tidbits.
Read on for a catchup on all things comics in the last week.
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As usual, important news stuff is at the top. Stan Sakai, author ofUsagi Yojimbo, needs some donation help. His wife is currently ill and needs 24-hour care and medicines that Sakai’s insurance cannot fully insure. Donations are currently down due to PayPal issues, but artists are encouraged to donate original pieces to CAPS (The Cartoon Art Professional Society) for an organized auction in which all proceeds will be going directly to Sakai to support his wife. If interested in donating, call 310-365-8457 or fill this form out and mail it to the address on said form. If you still would like to donate, bookmark this page and wait shortly as issues with PayPal will be sorted soon.
Rest in peace to the legendary Al Plastino, famous for his work on Superman and co-creating Supergirl. He was 91.
Rina Ayuyang created a big auction on Ebay to raise money for the Philippines and their typhoon relief. Peep it and grab some new art.
Fantagraphics is extremely close to hitting $200,000 on their Kickstarter for their 2014 spring season catalog of books. They have met their goal weeks ago, but extra money will definitely be going to a great publisher. They will be funded in 8 days.
I reviewed issue #1 of a comic book called Chicken Outfit. Very impressed with the comic, happy to see a comedy/horror comic that isn’t afraid of being gruesome and entertaining.
Here’s an awesome interview with Bill Willingham about his new Fables spinoff, Fairest in All the Land, conducted by Brian Truitt of USA Today.
Paolo Riverapaid tribute to EC Comics’ Wally Wood with the last Mondo print offered. It’s already sold out (sorry if you’re just now hearing about this), but you can gaze in awe at the print here.
Rob Kirby posted his third annual list compiling his favorite mini-comics and self-published works of the year 2013. It’s a great read if you’re looking for something solid to read that’s also fairly new.
Tom of TCR posted a Collective Memory of Thought Bubble 2013, filled with a video and tons of galleries from the event. Thought Bubble took place in Leeds.
Drawn and Quarterly is having a massive sale on their titles. 40% off a ton of great books. Get them now through December 2.
Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips might be seeing their series, Sleeper, adapted into film, thanks to producers Ben Affleck and Matt Damon. The Shield creator Shawn Ryan and collaborator David Wiener will be writing the screenplay. No director attached yet.
The Globe has created a 10 best comics list for the year. Several names listed on this one page are great, including Michael DeForge and Gilbert Hernandez.
Washington Post created a 10 best comics of the year list. It’s all there. Includes a bunch of books I highly recommend.

Indie Comic Roundup

It’s time for my weekly link dump of all things comics-related on the lesser known and not Marvel/DC side of things. Today’s got links featuring Drawn & Quarterly, a sweet Mondo print by Paolo Rivera, Sean Phillips and Ed Brubaker, some links to charities and donation sites due to this week’s holiday season and recent troublesome events, reviews by yours truly, some lists to top off 2013 in comics, and a whole lot of other tidbits.

Read on for a catchup on all things comics in the last week.

Read More

Indie Comic Roundup
Been a while since I’ve been one of these. Here’s a link drop of what’s been going on in the lesser-known comics world for the past week, featuring bits from Oily Comics, Vertigo, No Brow, Koyama Press, 2D Cloud, and more.
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AMC has ordered a pilot for Vertigo’s infamous Preacher series. It’s being filmed for sure, which is extremely exciting news for fans of the series and Vertigo comics alike, but no word yet on who is involved.
I reviewed Fata Morgana by Jon Vermilyea. Really recommend checking this book by Koyama Press out if you’re into illustration and beautiful colors.
I checked out Freud by Corinne Maier and Anne Simon, published by No Brow. Very interesting non-fiction graphic novel about the infamous Sigmund Freud.
Also reviewed Out of Hollow Water by Anna Bongiovanni last week. A definite staple in 2D Cloud’s catalogue and an impressive graphic novel overall. Strong female undertones and gripping, dark, intellectual storytelling. One of the best surprises of the year.
In celebration of Alan Moore’s 60th birthday, Sequential has released Gary Millidge’s Alan Moore: An Extraordinary Gentleman for free, via digital download on iTunes. If you have an iPad, this is a must-have. They’ve also cut prices on some of Moore’s titles: From Hell is $3.99 from the publisher, while The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Century and Nemo: Heart of Iceare priced at $2.99 each.
ComicsAlliance posted on Oily’s subscription service as part of their Holiday Gift Guide. I wholesomely agree. Oily Comics offers a subscription service for three months and it’s a great price for great mini-comics and zines: $20 gets you 15 comics for three months, in addition to other neat things like postcards and coupons. Jump on that business.
ComicsAlliance also posted this great article explaining Kickstarter and their popularity with funding comics. This stems from the recent funding of Fantagraphics’ Kickstarter, in which they were funded $150,000 in simply one week for asking for help from readers to fund their next years’ catalogue.
Chris Mautner posted about six comics he grabbed from this weekend’s Comic Arts Brooklyn event. Worth reading about these comics worth reading.
Speaking of CAB, Tom at The Comics Reporter made this giant list compiling posts about the event in case you weren’t able to attend.
In case you missed it here on ALBOTAS, here’s a list I’ve compiled of the funniest comics I’ve had a chance to read.

Indie Comic Roundup

Been a while since I’ve been one of these. Here’s a link drop of what’s been going on in the lesser-known comics world for the past week, featuring bits from Oily Comics, Vertigo, No Brow, Koyama Press, 2D Cloud, and more.

Read More

The Funniest Comics I’ve Ever Read
Humor and comics go hand-in-hand, with major titles such as Hawkeye and She-Hulk blending superhero action and comedy in a witty way. And while I could easily name some bigger/mainstream titles right off the bat that may already be known to feature jokes and one-liners, I’m not going to do that.
Instead, here’s a list of the funniest alternative comic books I’ve ever read, mostly outrageous from the plot alone. Keep in mind these are solely from what I’ve read and humor is a totally critically subjective topic, but I still expect some disagreements.
Hit the jump for some comedic comic recommendations.
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The Scott Pilgrim Series
Okay, I know a bunch of people have read this series and it’s pretty widely known that Bryan Lee O’Malley is a hilarious guy, but there’s no way in Hell I can just not include it on this list. The Scott Pilgrim series is one of the funniest comic books ever created, hands down. It revolves around an awesome 23-year-old dude, Scott Pilgrim, who falls for fashionable girl named Ramona Flowers and ends up having to defeat her seven evil exes to be happily bonded together.
It’s got some amazing style and humor. It’s almost disguised as a manga, with black and white (color editions are out now from Oni Press) coloring and huge panels, similar to comics done on the east side of the world. It’s also got great wit throughout and a ton of homages to numerous video game series and heavily relates with awkward nerdy kids. Surely one of the funniest comics to ever hit store shelves.

Hark! A Vagrant
New Yorker cartoonist, Kate Beaton, has created one of the funniest webcomics created, Hark! A Vagrant. This terrific comic literally teases every era of western civilization through humorous historical parodies with the wittiest jokes ever placed inside of a panel.
The comic has given Beaton four Harvey awards in the past, including wins in the “Humor,” “Best Cartoonist,” and “Online Work,” categories. Famous characters and events in both history and literature are parodied and poked fun at, providing some hard laugh-out-loud moments. I haven’t read much funnier than Hark! A Vagrant.

Bighead
Bighead is a parody of superhero comic books and characters, created by comic author, Jeffrey Brown. Unlike most of Brown’s early autobiographical work, this is a narrative revolving around a superhero who simply has a huge head and strong emotions.
It’s full of clever cliches and hilariously weird villains, such as Bullman, a villain with a bull’s head and a wrestler’s outfit who is an “icon of senseless male aggression,” and Tsunami, a fat man who controls water who Bighead eventually defeats by literally soaking him up with a sponge. It’s a super fun read and has some of the best one-liners I’ve read in any comic book, providing some clever social commentary and superb retro superhero action. 
Brown released two books with Bighead: Sulk Volume 1 and a stand-alone graphic novel based on the character, both published by Top Shelf Comix.

King City
Brandon Graham’s King City is everything Scott Pilgrim could have been had Bryan Lee O’Malley decided to expand his universe into every which way possible. It’s super wonky and futuristic, giving an alternative feeling of punk-rock style visuals and a super cartoon-feel.
Absolutely nothing short of fantastic, King City is also one of the most amusing comics I’ve ever had a chance to come across. The story revolves around a thief named Joe who’s also a cat master, which is a being who could control the power of cats, injecting it with different needles in order to get specific tasks done. It’s insane.
Joe and his cat, Earthling, live in a city similar to New York or Tokyo, entirely populated by ninjas, spies, thieves, ghettoes, weird drugs and crazy hideouts. There’s also a guaranteed pun on every single page of this book. King City is a reflection of literally everything Graham can associate his art with, so it’s totally bananas and seriously hilarious.
All 424-pages of King City were published by Image Comics.

The Amazing Screw-On Head
Between B.P.R.D. and the Hellboy series, Mike Mignola did a one-shot comic book called The Amazing Screw-On Head in 2002. The idea of the character was based off of Batman action figures, and how each figure seemingly was the exact same, except with different paint jobs. Mignola thought, why not create a hero that can screw-on his head onto different bodies to fit the occasion?
So he made The Amazing Screw-On Head, a short black comedy comic book revolving around a character called Screw-On Head, who is an undercover agent for president Abraham Lincoln, who must track down the evil Emperor Zombie in search of a stolen manuscript with the help of his two sidekicks, Mr. Groin and Mr. Dog (a dog).
Believe it or not, it’s more ridiculous than it sounds, and it’s super hilarious, full of imagination and weird occult stuff. There’s also an animated version of the comic book that aired on the Syfy channel, with Paul Giamatti voicing Screw-Head himself. 
The Amazing Screw-On Head was published by Dark Horse Comics, and although it was a one-shot, it has been collected in hardcover format with a couple of other short stories by Mignola.

Eat More Bikes
Nathan Bulmer has created a masterpiece of comic comedy with his debut comic book, Eat More Bikes. I’ve read Eat More Bikes numerous times this year and have recommended this title to anyone wanting a great laugh since it’s so accessible and easy-to-read.
Bulmer draws hilarious short comics with ridiculous situations and the most absurd punchlines you’ll ever get a chance to read, hands down. 36 pages, but totally 100% worth any price for the amount of laughs Bulmer tosses at readers.
This comic was published by small pubs favorite of mine, Koyama Press.

The Perry Bible Fellowship
Before I even started this list, I had the idea of only limiting comics to those with a narrative. But I honestly cannot justify creating a funniest comics list and not including the greatest webcomic ever created: The Perry Bible Fellowship.
I’ve never seen sharper humor in my entire life and it honestly may never be topped. Not on the internet, not in a book — no where can PBF really be topped in terms of humor and substantial greatness.
Those of you needing a dose of PBF can head over to their site to read strips for free, while those wanting a physical form of reads can buy the book off of Amazon for a totally reasonable price.

The Funniest Comics I’ve Ever Read

Humor and comics go hand-in-hand, with major titles such as Hawkeye and She-Hulk blending superhero action and comedy in a witty way. And while I could easily name some bigger/mainstream titles right off the bat that may already be known to feature jokes and one-liners, I’m not going to do that.

Instead, here’s a list of the funniest alternative comic books I’ve ever read, mostly outrageous from the plot alone. Keep in mind these are solely from what I’ve read and humor is a totally critically subjective topic, but I still expect some disagreements.

Hit the jump for some comedic comic recommendations.

Read More

Samurai Jack #1 - The Albotas Review
Genndy Tartakovsky's Samurai Jack is officially back, but in a new medium it seems, as IDW has recently published the debut comic book series revolving around the legendary character. The incredibly acclaimed animated show never resolved anything after its cancellation in season 4, which left fans to kind of just sit around on the Internet, awaiting news for the feature length film Tartakovsky has been promising for years, or some form of a season 5 Cartoon Network would miraculously greenlight.
It sucks, but alas, fans of the show have something new and tangible to look forward to thanks to publisher IDW: a beautiful comic book written by Jim Zub and drawn by Andy Suriano, which holds the core of the show on its flimsy-paged back.
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Immediately, the comic book begins with Jack crossing the desert to find an old hermit for some wisdom on how to undue evil Aku’s future terror. He kicks off a quest to search for the Threads of Time to reconstruct the Rope of Eons, which hopefully will bring him back to his former time where he can finally stop Aku. Along the way, we’ve got bright colors, a big gladiator battle, and what honestly seems like a long lost episode of the original animated Samurai Jack.

[+] AWESOME
This baby is authentic. I mean that. Samurai Jack #1 honestly feels like Genndy Tartakovsky created this comic book himself. Jim Zub did a fine job of crafting a story in an extremely familiar fashion, for both fans and newcomers to enjoy. That’s a great thing, as not once while reading this book do you feel like this is a cash grab from IDW to tap into nostalgic 20-somethings. It’s funny when it needs to be and action-packed when it gets down to it. Zub got Jack spot on, giving the character bluntly spoken lines and a wooden personality.
If you have any doubt in the artwork, just know that artist Andy Suriano worked on the actual show as a character designer. This guy knows what he’s doing. The comic certainly bears the feeling and atmosphere the show carried, with the use of vivid colors and crazy unique characters. Suriano adds his own style to the mix as well, thankfully.
It’s more Samurai Jack. New stories involving one of the coolest heroes in animation. How cool is that!

[-] NOT AWESOME
It’s a bit short. It definitely sets up a story everyone wants to hear more of, but the action and pacing is pretty fast.


FINAL THOUGHTS
I mean, come on dude. You really gotta doubt this? This is exactly the calling everyone has been waiting for regarding a legendary animated series. Jim Zub and Andy Suriano have created a solid introduction to Samurai Jack in comics. If you’re a fan, you’ve got no excuse not to pick this up. Newcomers will definitely jump on board to await anxiously for the story to unravel.
VERDICT: Really? Buy this shit.

Samurai Jack #1 - The Albotas Review

Genndy Tartakovsky's Samurai Jack is officially back, but in a new medium it seems, as IDW has recently published the debut comic book series revolving around the legendary character. The incredibly acclaimed animated show never resolved anything after its cancellation in season 4, which left fans to kind of just sit around on the Internet, awaiting news for the feature length film Tartakovsky has been promising for years, or some form of a season 5 Cartoon Network would miraculously greenlight.

It sucks, but alas, fans of the show have something new and tangible to look forward to thanks to publisher IDW: a beautiful comic book written by Jim Zub and drawn by Andy Suriano, which holds the core of the show on its flimsy-paged back.

Read More

New York Comic Con 2013 Cosplay Round Up
NYCC may be finished, but our coverage continues as we bring you photo galleries and exclusive videos all week long. It’s just like being at the actual con, only without all the chafing and body odor!
Click through for some of the spectacular cosplay we spotted in between waiting in line for panels and blowing money on things
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Make sure to follow us at @albotas on Twitter and “Like” us on Facebook at facebook.com/albotas.

New York Comic Con 2013 Cosplay Round Up

NYCC may be finished, but our coverage continues as we bring you photo galleries and exclusive videos all week long. It’s just like being at the actual con, only without all the chafing and body odor!

Click through for some of the spectacular cosplay we spotted in between waiting in line for panels and blowing money on things

Read More

The End of the Fucking World, by Charles Forsman - The Albotas Review
The End of the Fucking World was originally a 16 part minicomic series created by Charles Forsman, owner of the small press company known as Oily Comics. The minis were sold at $1 a pop and quickly rose to the top of many lists in 2012, creating huge buzz over blogs as one of the best comics of the year, according to The Comics Journal and Comic Book Resources. Fantagraphics did a great deed for collecting these minis into one softcover book for all who couldn’t find a physical copy.
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Fantagraphics$20, 176 pages, black & white, 5″ x 6.5″, softcover
This year, the series is nominated for an Ignatz award in the “Outstanding Minicomic,” category, specifically for it’s 16th issue. I’m a bit late to the scene with this breathtaking title from Chuck Forsman, but damn do I feel like The End of the Fucking World will be talked about for an extensive amount of time. Forsman has illustrated a seriously dark comic in which two angst-filled teenagers are doing terrible things. If you want a glipse of how dark this comic is, just take a look at that bold statement that is the title of the book and stare at the intense tint of red on the cover. This kind of story is a void of comic book I don’t see often.
TEotFW revolves around two teens, named James and Alyssa, going on a road trip away from their parents and venturing into an awful journey of nothingness. Each chapter is told from a different perspective, with James and Alyssa alternating points of view between each part of the story. We’ll get a look at James’ view on Alyssa and his personal upbringing, while Alyssa will show readers how much she blindingly falls for James.

Through each chapter, we find James giving off more and more confirmation that he’s a young sociopath who is aiding in ruining Alyssa’s young life. His chapter starts off detailing his first affair with murdering animals at the age of 13, punching his father out and stealing his car at 17, and within a few more chapters, venturing further into sociopathic nature, revealing his troubling thoughts and murderous urges he tries restraining.
Alyssa’s views of the world are about the same as James, except more angst filled and less of an evident disorder. It could be Alyssa’s combination of young love with James, as well as James’ influence on her to accept doing horrible things in her life. She’s masked with fear throughout the book, while James is comfortable, knowledgable there’s something wrong with his way of thinking, yet never comprehending what exactly he is yearning to feel for.

All the adults featured in the book seem to represent an aggressive force of authority for the kids to run from and attempt to exploit. They break into a professor’s house who is on vacation and live together for a bit, experiencing what their lives could be if they could sustain a place with each other. The plot gathers momentum as the professor comes home early and James slits the man’s throat, showing Alyssa proof of him being a Satanist and a terrible person — more terrible than James may think he is, which is reason it was justifiable to actually murder in both of the kids’ eyes.
It is then that the story becomes deeper than what’s revealed on the angsty teenage surface. It’s a story that explores psychopathy. It explores teenage rebellion against authority and a need for love and understanding. The dark, simplistic style of drawing from Charles Forsman is that of Charles Schulz, injected with a syringe of impurity. The creepy illustrations and the quickly escalated momentum of problems in The End Of The Fucking World is absolutely insane. It’s gritty and clearly conveyed as crazy. The discomforting, disturbing story is a unique comic book nothing short of fantastic.

The End of the Fucking World, by Charles Forsman - The Albotas Review

The End of the Fucking World was originally a 16 part minicomic series created by Charles Forsman, owner of the small press company known as Oily Comics. The minis were sold at $1 a pop and quickly rose to the top of many lists in 2012, creating huge buzz over blogs as one of the best comics of the year, according to The Comics Journal and Comic Book ResourcesFantagraphics did a great deed for collecting these minis into one softcover book for all who couldn’t find a physical copy.

Read More

The highly anticipated, Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., premiered on Tuesday night to many mixed feelings from critics and fans alike. The show was screened to an amazing 11.9 million television viewers, which isn’t surprising considering the massive amount of hype the show has garnered since The Avengers blew up box offices. Its director, Joss Whedon, has done nothing but gather attention toward this show, showing it off as a cool new television series to correspond the aftermath of the first Avengers movie, and introduce a new cast of heroes who handle the smaller stuff the big guys, like Hulk and Captain America, don’t.
Joss Whedon, his brother Jed Whedon, and Jed’s wife Maurissa Tancharoen, all worked together to craft a television show of minor spy action and X-Files type dilemmas. The show takes place in Marvel’s Cinematic Universe, brings back Agent Colson, and is sure to gather even more momentum by its second episode. But overall, the pilot was just…okay.
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AWESOME [+]
Clark Gregg is back as Agent Phil Coulson. It’s great to see an already known character of the Marvel universe bringing some familiarity to the new show.
The fighting, when it happened, was fun to watch. The gadgets included in the show were interesting. It’s a wondrous setup for a world of secret agent possibilities Whedon is prepping us up for.
As much as the show seemed like it would drag, it kept things amusing. Corny jokes included, I didn’t once think of turning off Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
I mean, more live-action Marvel on a weekly basis. How cool is that!
NOT AWESOME [-]
This show feels totally 90’s. I feel like everyone is dismissing this with a “that’s just Joss Whedon, haven’t you seen Buffy?,” attitude, but I can’t accept that. Whedon in the 90’s is different from post-Avengers-with-a-billion-dollar-budget-Whedon.
Not as smart as it could have been. Corny jokes aside, the pilot was extremely simplistic and used words like “gamma,” “New York incident ” and “The Hulk,” to grab the attention of those wanting something bigger than what was presented. This is an extremely small-scale squad of government agents dealing with a world of superheroes. They won’t be dealing with Captain America and Thor every episode, and I don’t think that’s going to happen any time soon.
Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. was absolutely always shown with Coulson’s character being pretty much resurrected after have dying in The Avengers film. There is no plausible reason why Coulson is back in the show and no in-depth answer was really given. It was kind of shunned. Hopefully it’s answered soon?
VERDICT
Truth is, this is more like the Bourne trilogy mixed with feelings of X-Files than it is anything related to Marvel’s Avengers film. That’s not a bad thing, but it’s also not what a huge chunk of the audience was expecting. There’s not much we can expect right now with Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and as much as I’d love to watch S.H.I.E.L.D. agents try to recapture Spider-Man’s alien symbiote suit (wouldn’t happen due to license issues), or the agency attempting to stop a b-lister villain from killing innocent civilians (I’m pretty sure license issues are a key part to this show being not a total nerdgasm at the moment), I think the show is leaning toward original story arcs and characters if anything at all.
While the pilot wasn’t exactly the strongest, it’s also just a setup for each character involved and how things will run from here on out. Hopefully it pulls itself together by episode three so we can get a true feel for the show.

The highly anticipated, Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., premiered on Tuesday night to many mixed feelings from critics and fans alike. The show was screened to an amazing 11.9 million television viewers, which isn’t surprising considering the massive amount of hype the show has garnered since The Avengers blew up box offices. Its director, Joss Whedon, has done nothing but gather attention toward this show, showing it off as a cool new television series to correspond the aftermath of the first Avengers movie, and introduce a new cast of heroes who handle the smaller stuff the big guys, like Hulk and Captain America, don’t.

Joss Whedon, his brother Jed Whedon, and Jed’s wife Maurissa Tancharoen, all worked together to craft a television show of minor spy action and X-Files type dilemmas. The show takes place in Marvel’s Cinematic Universe, brings back Agent Colson, and is sure to gather even more momentum by its second episode. But overall, the pilot was just…okay.

Read More

Fox and Warner Bros. Announce New Police Drama, Gotham
It seems like Warner Bros. wants to have something to coincide with Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. television show on ABC. Fox and Warner Bros. Television are apparently working on a television show titled ‘Gotham,’ focusing on the police force in Gotham City and a young James Gordon before he became a commissioner. We’ll follow Gordon as he does detective work revolving around some of Gotham’s most famous villains.
I like this idea a lot, as it’s been done in a couple of alternative DC comics already. Most notably, Gotham Central, by Ed Brubaker, Greg Rucka and MIchael Lark. It really opened the idea of how interesting it really could be following around the Gotham police force in a post-Batman world.
The show will be developed by Bruno Heller, who also worked on HBO’s Rome and CBS’ Mentalist. No word on when anything else will come out of this any time soon, but regardless, I’m excited.

Fox and Warner Bros. Announce New Police Drama, Gotham

It seems like Warner Bros. wants to have something to coincide with Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. television show on ABC. Fox and Warner Bros. Television are apparently working on a television show titled ‘Gotham,’ focusing on the police force in Gotham City and a young James Gordon before he became a commissioner. We’ll follow Gordon as he does detective work revolving around some of Gotham’s most famous villains.

I like this idea a lot, as it’s been done in a couple of alternative DC comics already. Most notably, Gotham Central, by Ed Brubaker, Greg Rucka and MIchael Lark. It really opened the idea of how interesting it really could be following around the Gotham police force in a post-Batman world.

The show will be developed by Bruno Heller, who also worked on HBO’s Rome and CBS’ Mentalist. No word on when anything else will come out of this any time soon, but regardless, I’m excited.

Fantagraphics Announces The Complete Eightball
Fantagraphics has revealed the company will be publishing a massive 454-paged collection of issues #1-#18 of Daniel Clowes' Eightball. That should include his infamous Ghost World comic, as well as Like a Velvet Cast In Iron, Pussey, and a couple of other stories. The collection will be a two-volume set, complete with slipcase, commentary between comic covers, and according to what Eric Reynolds told Comics Reporter, "a not-insigificant amount of strips that for whatever reason, Dan never wanted to collect.”

Fantagraphics Announces The Complete Eightball


Fantagraphics
has revealed the company will be publishing a massive 454-paged collection of issues #1-#18 of Daniel Clowes' Eightball. That should include his infamous Ghost World comic, as well as Like a Velvet Cast In IronPussey, and a couple of other stories. The collection will be a two-volume set, complete with slipcase, commentary between comic covers, and according to what Eric Reynolds told Comics Reporter"a not-insigificant amount of strips that for whatever reason, Dan never wanted to collect.”

The Stars Wars #1 - The Albotas Review
So here’s an interesting concept for a comic book. Dark Horse Comics got their hands on the original rough draft screenplay that George Lucas wrote before the Star Wars we know and love was created, simply titled “The Star Wars.” Dark Horse decided to take that rough draft and give it to writerJ.W. Rinzler and artist Mike Mayhew to adapt into an 8-issue comic book mini-series.
So they did it and issue #1 released about a week ago. And although it’s totally not Rinzler’s fault, the comic book is kind of…bad.
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[+] AWESOME
This is such a cool idea and neat opportunity for Star Wars and comic book fans to see a rough drafted version of the original Star Wars screenplay. It’s interesting to see the vast similarities and huge differences between what was in theaters versus what Lucas actually had planned.
George Lucas himself has approved the pages of The Star Wars, so you know he can fess up to this (rough drafted) mess in the future (unlike the holiday special). It’s 100% authentic.
Mike Mayhew’s artwork is incredible. It’s detailed where it wants to be and really captures the Star Wars sense of feeling, showcasing a vast galaxy with fascinating characters and places.
The final page of the comic shows a concept of what the original Stardestroyer was going to look like. Again, the ideas and similarities between the draft and the original film are just an overall cool thing to see.
[-] NOT AWESOME
Perhaps the biggest problem The Star Wars faces is it’s large cast of characters and places. This isn’t simple to comprehend like the original films. This is huge setup that doesn’t explain itself by the end of the comic.
We’ve got Governor Hoedaack, Whitsun, Annikin Starkiller, Darth Vader, the Jedi-Bendu, Vantos Coll, Seig Darklighter, King Kayos, Queen Breha, Senator Nash, and so many other characters in this first issue. But who the hell are they and will when will we care? There are far too many cast members in this comic and too little time for you to pick up on who does what and why you should care about them.
The majority of everyone’s motives are unclear. Thanks to it’s vast number of characters, you’re not going to have time to root for anyone. I’m not even sure who the ‘good guys’ are yet…
And since you won’t really care about anyone, the first issue ends up pretty flat and boring. 
This is an 8-part comic, sure, but I’ve read a couple of interviews where Rinzler explained that it could not be cut down any shorter than 8 issues and anything less would be too short. If so much is thrown at the reader in this first issue alone, what makes further books easier to comprehend? 
VERDICT
The Star Wars is a really cool concept, and I’ll be reading the entire comic series to see how it all pans out and what Lucas originally had created, but other than that and Mayhew’s art, it has nothing really going for it at the moment. Star Wars fans and curious readers may enjoy the original story unfold, but most will find it to be boring and clearly understand why this was a rough draft and not the final product.

The Stars Wars #1 - The Albotas Review


So here’s an interesting concept for a comic book. Dark Horse Comics got their hands on the original rough draft screenplay that George Lucas wrote before the Star Wars we know and love was created, simply titled “The Star Wars.” Dark Horse decided to take that rough draft and give it to writerJ.W. Rinzler and artist Mike Mayhew to adapt into an 8-issue comic book mini-series.

So they did it and issue #1 released about a week ago. And although it’s totally not Rinzler’s fault, the comic book is kind of…bad.

Read More

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